Hair Test Interpretation: Finding Hidden Toxicities

by Andrew Hall Cutler, PhD, PE

© 2004, 2008, 2009 Andrew Hall Cutler

About the book

Read some excerpts from the book:

Table of contents

Preface

Calcium

Index

Reasons to check for HM

Mercury

Back cover copy

Why worry about HM

Iron

How to order the book

Cancer

Thallium

 

Schizophrenia

Selenium

Medical conditions Heavy Metals cause

Developmental disorders

Zinc

Other books of interest (vaccines cancer autism hormone balance etc)

 Phone order to (425) 557-8299 or Download fax and mail order form

 


       

 

Excerpt from the book:

What Textbooks say about Schizophrenia   

Textbook of Clinical Neurology, by Goetz, second edition, 2003, says in the section on mercury poisoning:  “Psychotic episodes with delirium, hallucinations, and motor hyperactivity have been reported.”

Lead, mercury, carbon disulfide are listed as possible causes of acute psychosis  in table 11-2 on page 107 of the Textbook of Primary Care Medicine, Noble,  third edition, 2001.

Several other standard medical texts say that mercury exposure should be ruled out in anyone showing up at the hospital with an unexpected psychotic episode.  In addition to this, there is journal literature directly linking mercury amalgam dental fillings to schizophrenia1.

The sixteen year old boy whose hair test is presented on page 49 started out as a happy and friendly child.  He was athletic, he enjoyed sports a lot and he was quite involved in them.  He would sometimes play more than one sport in a season – great fun for him but his parents still remember how tiring it was to bring him to all the practices and games!  School often did not come easy to him.  He would spend long hours doing homework (without the need for parental pressure) and get by with average grades despite this great effort.  He was able to relate to people of all ages, was well liked and got along with everyone.  He passed the lifeguard test and planned to be a lifeguard the next summer.  One of his goals was to play college football.

Around his sixteenth birthday he started to complain to his parents that the kids at school were talking about him.  The parents didn’t recognize this as suggesting any mental disturbance and simply hoped things would work themselves out.  Then suddenly one day the boy was locking doors and saying that people were trying to break in to get him.  He told his parents that the people on TV were talking to him.  He was also hearing voices.  He was very upset by this.  Realizing at this point that something was seriously wrong, the parents took him to the emergency psychiatric ward, where he was kept as a patient for three weeks until he was stabilized on medication. 

He was initially diagnosed as having manic depression2 and treated aggressively with  Risperdal and lithium. He gained weight, paced constantly, couldn’t focus on anything, showed no emotions and had a very different personality.  The parents thought he was overmedicated and, with physician supervision, started reducing the Rispderal dose.  The boy subsequently developed heavy breathing, stopped talking, and acted like a zombie.  He was brought back to the doctors who decided he was having another psychotic episode.  By this time the parents had educated themselves, declined to let the doctors keep their son as an inpatient, and convinced the doctors to treat him as a schizophrenic rather than bipolar since his symptoms fit that more closely.  The lithium was dropped, and Abilify was substituted for the Risperdal in hopes of lowering the side effects, and he was released to his parents’ care. 

The boy still had profound personality changes, still paced a lot, and did a lot of smiling for no apparent reason.  He could not stay focused on anything and really couldn’t do his schoolwork.  He would show up and dress for sports but didn’t play in competition.  He didn’t talk much and couldn’t really carry on a conversation.

His new psychiatrist asked the parents not to dismiss the diagnosis of bipolar disorder too quickly, but held out no real hope of anything other than a lifetime of being medicated to the gills and nonfunctional regardless of whether they eventually decided the boy was schizophrenic or bipolar.  From the parents’ perspective the first year was Hell.  The (mainstream medical) doctors offered little help, seemed to have a narrow view of the possible differential diagnosis, and mostly seemed to make their son worse with their prescribed treatments.  These doctors told the parents that their son would be like this for the rest of his life and the parents needed to prepare for that.

Based on their own research regarding possible etiologic agents for their son’s condition, the parents decided to get a hair test done to check for heavy metal problems since some of these (mercury, manganese) are well known to cause mental disorders and are mentioned in standard textbooks as problems that should be ruled out when someone unexpectedly has a psychotic episode.  The boy’s hair test is shown on the facing page

...

Giving chelation a try seemed like a reasonable thing to do on this basis as a possible alternative to a lifetime of dysfunction and heavy medication.

...

The father was immediately convinced that his son needed chelation, but the mother resisted it at first because the doctors told her it was dangerous, couldn’t possibly help, that a lot of people got hurt by it, that DMSA was not an FDA approved drug (it is), and managed to frighten the mother into believing that she would hurt her son in some manner if she tried to chelate him.

The father had read enough on chelation and mercury – mostly on the internet – to be able to discuss these issues intelligently with the doctors.  He would attempt to have reasoned discussions with the doctors while his wife listened in. A typical encounter would go like this: first the doctors would say that the son couldn’t possibly have a mercury problem because he didn’t have high levels in his blood or urine.  The when the father pointed out that even mainstream medical textbooks like Harrison’s Textbook of Internal Medicine and Cecil Textbook of Medicine said that blood levels only showed current exposure the doctors would reluctantly admit he was right, that they weren’t familiar with the subject, then would refuse to prescribe DMSA because they weren’t familiar with it! 

The mother became convinced that chelation was worth trying when her husband showed her on the FDA website that DMSA was an approved medication for heavy metal chelation, and when she saw her husband argue rings around doctor after doctor, none of whom offered any reasonable discussion as to why heavy metal toxicity should not be considered and treated.  Eventually the parents were able to find a doctor who was willing to prescribe DMSA and provide appropriate care for their son.

After 6 months and 23 chelation rounds ... the parents have been able to lower their son’s dose of Abilify substantially.  The school called and said the son was suddenly talking to people again!  School officials continued to call every so often reporting further improvement.  The wrestling coach said he could see the boy growing up before his eyes – by the end of the season he was acting somewhat normal, was able to compete in wrestling, and took first place in one of the wrestling tournaments. 

While their son still has a ways to go, the parents could see after 23 chelation weekends that their son would become normal again in the foreseeable future.  In fact, they were able to see progress after the third weekend.  In addition to behavioral improvements, chronic acne on the boy’s back suddenly disappeared and hasn’t come back.  The parents say the difference in their son’s condition after six months of chelation is like night and day.

The parents report that chelation can cause increased symptoms as a side effect.  While the symptoms come and go, they don’t all come at once, and when they go, they are usually gone for good. 

The boy’s psychiatrist continues to insist that chelation can’t possibly be doing any good and now offers the explanation that the boy must never have had bipolar disorder or schizophrenia and is just getting better on his own.

This is what the father has to say about his experiences over the last year and a half:  “This whole situation with my son really opened my eyes. These mainstream doctors will talk against chelation like they are experts. But, I will sit and talk the facts with them. They will then tell me that they really do not know much about it. You would think that they see the improvements in my son and look into it.  With what happen to my son my eyes are now open to the toxic metal problem. I am amazed at how many people I see that they or their children could possibly have this problem and are not being treated properly. My sister has found out that her problems could be due to this toxic metal poisoning. She had her fillings taken out and will be chelating. Too bad a doctor did not look into this possibility for her years ago.   I believe chelation saved my son a life of misery.  Look at how many other people who are suffering that could be helped as well. I try my best to let other people know. I just hope some of them will give it a try and look into it as a possible solution to their problems.”

1)      Psychometric Evidence that Dental Amalgam Mercury May be an Etiological Factor in Schizophrenia, Siblerud, Motl and Kienholz, Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine, volume 14, number 4, pages 201-9, 1999.

2)      The medical term is bipolar disorder.

 Phone order to (425) 557-8299 or Download fax and mail order form

 


       

 

About the book

Read some excerpts from the book:

Table of contents

Preface

Calcium

Index

Reasons to check for HM

Mercury

Back cover copy

Why worry about HM

Iron

How to order the book

Cancer

Thallium

 

Schizophrenia

Selenium

Medical conditions Heavy Metals cause

Developmental disorders

Zinc

Other books of interest (vaccines cancer autism hormone balance etc)


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